Australia Australia

New Documents

The Australian Federal Police issued an alert highlighting the dangers associated with becoming a money mule.

The Australian Department of Home Affairs published an independent review of integrity concerns related to procurement and contract management processes.

Enforcement Actions

The Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre accepted an enforceable undertaking from the Perth, Australia-based government-owned mint that requires it to improve its anti-money laundering and counterterrorist financing compliance measures.

The Australian Prudential and Regulation Authority increased Medibank Private’s capital requirement by $250 million for weaknesses in its information security following a major cyber incident in October 2022.


Important Facts

  • The U.S. State Department classifies Australia as a jurisdiction of primary concern. Money laundering is the common element in almost all serious and organized crime in Australia. The country’s financial intelligence unit, the Australian Transaction and Reports Analysis Center (AUSTRAC), identifies four primary money laundering methods in the nation: the intermingling of legitimate and illicit financial activity through cash intensive businesses or front companies; the engagement of professional expertise, such as lawyers and accountants; the use of money laundering syndicates to provide specific money laundering services to domestic and international crime groups; and the “internationalization” of the Australian crime environment, a reflection of the pervasive international money laundering ties of Australia-based organized criminal groups. AUSTRAC also notes that money laundering is prevalent in the banking, money transfer and alternative remittance services, as well as gaming and luxury goods’ sectors. Less visible conduits include legal persons and arrangements, cash-intensive businesses, electronic payment systems, cross-border movement of cash and bearer negotiable instruments, international trade and investment vehicles. Trade-based money laundering is also a concern, though stricter border and customs regulations have limited its potential.
  • KYC Covered Entities: Banks; gaming and bookmaking establishments and casinos; bullion and cash dealers and money exchanges and remitters; electronic funds transferors; insurers and insurance intermediaries; securities or derivatives dealers; registrars and trustees; issuers, sellers, or redeemers of traveler’s checks, money orders, or similar instruments; preparers of payroll, in whole or in part in currency, on behalf of other persons; and currency couriers
  • STR Covered Entities: Banks; gaming and bookmaking establishments and casinos; bullion and cash dealers and money exchanges and remitters; electronic funds transferors; insurers and insurance intermediaries; securities or derivatives dealers; registrars and trustees; issuers, sellers, or redeemers of traveler’s checks, money orders, or similar instruments; preparers of payroll, in whole or in part in currency, on behalf of other persons; and currency couriers
  • Enhanced Due Diligence Procedures for PEPs: Foreign: Yes; Domestic: Yes
  • Money Laundering Criminal Prosecutions/Convictions: Prosecutions: 99 (July 2013 – June 2014); Convictions: 77 (July 2013 – June 2014)
-Source: 2016 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report (INCSR)

Rankings

FATF i | 2013 methodology

Technical Effectiveness
Compliant : 17 High : 1
Largely Compliant : 9 Substantial : 4
Partially Compliant : 9 Moderate : 6
Non-Compliant : 5 Low : 0

Australia's technical compliance was re-rated in a Nov. 8, 2018 follow-up report

BASEL i

Rank : 13/110
Score : 3.75/10

TRANSPARENCY INTERNATIONAL i

Rank : 11/180
Score : 77/100

Tax Justice Network i

Rank : 48/133
Score : 50/100