TOP STORY

Jan

24

Dutch Officials Prioritize AML Upgrades, Bankers Question the Details

Dutch Finance Minister Wopke Hoekstra, left, addresses reporters in Paris on Friday, March 1, 2019. Hoekstra confirmed Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2020, that the Netherlands will push ahead with planned anti-money laundering reforms. (Getty Images)

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Legs & Regs

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Dutch Finance Minister Wopke Hoekstra, left, addresses reporters in Paris on Friday, March 1, 2019. Hoekstra confirmed Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2020, that the Netherlands will push ahead with planned anti-money laundering reforms. (Getty Images)
Central American lender in global tax evasion and money laundering probe, Danish authorities overwhelmed by massive increase in STR filings, and more, in the weekly roundup.
Cryptocurrency exchanges are scrambling to routinely share required details of certain transactions after a senior U.S. official emphasized that blockchain technology is no substitute for compliance, sources told ACAMS moneylaundering.com.
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Enforcement Actions

The U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control entered into an agreement with the Stamford, CT-headquartered company, requiring it to pay a $1.125 million penalty to settle potential civil liability for 36 apparent violations of the Burmese Sanctions Regulations.
The Office of Foreign Assets Control of the U.S. Treasury Department ordered the New York, NY-based lobbying firm to pay $12,150 to settle potential civil liability for apparent violations of the Global Terrorism Sanctions Regulations.